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Is it possible to create a mixed media work of art digitally?  It is when you are using a wonderful collage based app combined with a drawing/painting app! 

Pretty soon, my students will be creating mixed media portraits using our art room iPads!  In the past, we've created artwork using the app Faces iMake, however, we were always so pressed for time being that we only had a few iPads.  In the interest of trying to give everyone a few minutes to create a collage portrait, students often felt rushed.  

Now that we are fortunate enough to have a class set of iPads in our art room, students will be able to work on projects from week to week using their very own iPads. 

They will start out using the Faces iMake app
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/faces-imake-right-brain-creativity/id439641851?mt=8
and will select, size and arrange various objects to make a face.  

Then, they will save their work and import the image into the Brushes app 
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/brushes-3/id545366251?mt=8

Using our styluses, students will outline and paint new details over their collages. Be sure to visit our Artsonia Gallery to see these works of art when they are finished! 
http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=602387#



 
 
I received an email from a mother/son app developing team based in Bulgaria yesterday.  Marina and Hrisoto Staykov released the app Amaziograph and thought I might find it to be a useful app in the art room.  They generously gifted their app to me to explore, and let's just say I was hooked immediately!  

This app takes me back to the days when I taught my students how to create tessellations using paper and markers.  The discovery of the Amaziograph app is inspiring me to want to teach how to create 21st century tessellations using iPads.  This video is a demo of how to use some of the functions within the app.  There are a number of grids and possible lessons that can be taught using this app.  I am looking forward to teaching traditional as well as digital tessellation- making in the art room.  

View the "How To" demo video I created below to see how I created my tessellations. 





The mirror  and kaleidoscope grids are also wonderful.  I recall teaching a lesson in which students wrote their names in script on a folded paper, superimposed the continuous line in their names and then designed an insect out of the letters.  With this app, students can turn the iPad sideways, write their name on the line and print their names in mirror image format.  Then, they can use traditional tools to design their insects, aliens, etc (see below).


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 (First Name Written in Script)

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(First Name Printed and Flipped Vertically: Ready to Transform into Insect/Alien/etc.)



The kaleidoscope function can be used to draw snowflakes, flowers, mandalas, etc.   

There are plenty of ways for us art teachers to design rich and engaging lessons that can incorporate traditional and traditional tools using this app.




 
 
David Hockney is a celebrated artist who has had his iPad artwork featured on the cover of the New Yorker several times.    http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2011/06/cover-story-he-draw-on-ipad.html

The video above features many of his iPad paintings on display in his current exhibition in London. 
We have only just begun to explore digital painting on our iPads at B.A., but look forward to having more opportunities.  

See some of our artists first digital paintings here in our Artsonia gallery.http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=442699