I received an email from a mother/son app developing team based in Bulgaria yesterday.  Marina and Hrisoto Staykov released the app Amaziograph and thought I might find it to be a useful app in the art room.  They generously gifted their app to me to explore, and let's just say I was hooked immediately!  

This app takes me back to the days when I taught my students how to create tessellations using paper and markers.  The discovery of the Amaziograph app is inspiring me to want to teach how to create 21st century tessellations using iPads.  This video is a demo of how to use some of the functions within the app.  There are a number of grids and possible lessons that can be taught using this app.  I am looking forward to teaching traditional as well as digital tessellation- making in the art room.  

View the "How To" demo video I created below to see how I created my tessellations. 





The mirror  and kaleidoscope grids are also wonderful.  I recall teaching a lesson in which students wrote their names in script on a folded paper, superimposed the continuous line in their names and then designed an insect out of the letters.  With this app, students can turn the iPad sideways, write their name on the line and print their names in mirror image format.  Then, they can use traditional tools to design their insects, aliens, etc (see below).


Picture
 
 (First Name Written in Script)

Picture
  
(First Name Printed and Flipped Vertically: Ready to Transform into Insect/Alien/etc.)



The kaleidoscope function can be used to draw snowflakes, flowers, mandalas, etc.   

There are plenty of ways for us art teachers to design rich and engaging lessons that can incorporate traditional and traditional tools using this app.




 
 
Mrs. LaRocca's 3rd grade students accessed their artwork using an online form that I created on Artsonia. From within their classroom, students took turns finding their work within the form. They typed their artist statements and clicked "submit" when they were finished. 

Since I could not be there while they were doing this work, I gave Mrs. La Rocca one of our Flip Video cameras and asked if students could film each other for a few seconds so that I could see them working on their statements. 

It was a pleasure to read and approve all of the artist statements from within my teacher account on Artsonia. All statements are now posted underneath student artwork in our gallery: bit.ly/s834Gr

We did not have enough time during art class for students to write their statements. Thank you Mrs. La Rocca for allowing students to compose their statements during your class time and for participating in this wonderful art, writing, and 21st century skills cross curricular lesson!